My first pattens

My first pattens

Pair of pattens, based on examples from circa 1400. This is my first attempt at making pattens. I decided on the flat style with leather hinge because these are the most appropriate to my SCA persona (circa 1400). The leather was some lightweight scrap I had lying around, and the wood was scraps of cedar fence planks that I had left over from another project. I know, medieval pattens were normally made of alder or poplar, but these are really just a practice pair anyway, so I used what scraps I had on hand. The “nail” is a new 1″ copper rivet. The only supplies I bought for this project were a small box of 1/2″ cut nails and a small box of rosette furniture tacks. I like the look of the rosettes, but I bent four of the wire tacks, so it took 16 of them for a 12-tack project. Also, since cedar is so prone to splitting, I don’t expect these to stand up to much (if any) actual use. The next pair I make will be of the same style, but made of thicker poplar (3/4″, compared to this 1/2″ cedar). I may also make some small adjustments to the leather pieces.

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2 responses to “My first pattens

    • Good question! I forgot to tell how I measured that in my post. What I did was I stood on a manila folder wearing my turnshoe and traced a close outline of the sole of the shoe (following the narrow waist and the point of the toe). Before moving my foot, I marked the MTP joints at the edges of the outline. The MTP joints are “the big knuckles” where the toes attach to the long bones in your foot. To make it a little easier to find, I lifted my heel to bend those MTP joints and marked where a wrinkle appeared in my shoe. Then I just drew a straight line across from the one mark to the other and cut out the contour. I marked this template R one one side, and flipped it over and marked it L on the other side, so it was the same thing in mirror image for both pattens.

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